Calendar of Events

Feb
22
Wed
THE RETURN OF THE COLUMBIA MAMMOTH
Feb 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

 A TITANS OF THE ICE AGE:  MAMMOTHS AND MASTODONS EVENT

 NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS AND CULTURE, SPOKANE, WASHINGTON

Program Description:  The Columbia mammoth, Mammut columbi, ranged across North America for most of the last Ice Age before fading into extinction soon after humans entered the scene.  Spectacular skull, bone, and tusk discoveries along Hangman and Pine Creeks near Spokane, WA in the 1870’s brought mammoths back into the public eye, and over the past few years they have become increasingly visible as a symbol for school and community awareness of our geologic past.  This slide presentation, led by writer and naturalist Jack Nisbet, will trace the tangled story of scientifically significant bones found on homesteads south of Spokane, and consider why they still resonate today.

Jack Nisbet is a Spokane-based writer who first explored Northwest mammoths in his book, Visible Bones, and has never really stopped.  His most recent work, Ancient Places, continues his efforts to incorporate geologic time and scale into stories about everyday life in the Inland Northwest.

Seating limited to 180, first-come, first-served.

The IAFI Cheney-Spokane Chapter is a sponsor of the Mammoth exhibit.

Mar
6
Mon
Glaciers: Jon Riedel: Puget Lobe Chapter Speaker Series
Mar 6 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Dr. Jon Riedel, geologist with North Cascades National Park, will present on the current status of glaciers in our region.

Mar
11
Sat
PALOUSE CANYON HIKE
Mar 11 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

Leaders for this popular hike are Lloyd Stoess and Gene Kiver.  With them, you will hike eight (8) miles up the Palouse Canyon to Palouse Falls.  This trail emphasizes the Ice Age Floods story and the local Native American and settlement history.  

On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the most difficult, this hike rates as a “10”.  A hiker should be in good physical shape (i.e., be able to hike three (3) miles without breaks).  It is suggested that participants do some up and down hill hiking prior to the fieldtrip.  A hiker should not have serious heart or vertigo problems.  Children must be at least age 10 and must be accompanied by an adult hiker. No pets are permitted on this hike.

 Download the Registration Form,#41, Hike, Palouse Canyon, March 11, 2017 to find the fee, departure and conclusion instructions, where to meet and other valuable information  For registration questions and how to join IAFI, contact hike registrar, Jacqui Turner by emailing her at or call 509.301.0007.  For hike information, contact Lloyd Stoess at or call his mobile # 509.954.3927. 

Mar
14
Tue
The Longest Journey
Mar 14 @ 6:45 pm – 8:30 pm
The Longest Journey @ Benton PUD Auditorium | Kennewick | Washington | United States

“In the fall of 1902, a Welch farmer happened upon one odd rock perched on a slope above the Willamette River.  It turned out to be a meteorite, and the slow unfolding of its story revealed links to Northwest mining, museum politics, Ice Age floods, human nature, and the deep history of the universe.”

Join us as Spokane-based teacher and naturalist Jack Nisbet presents the story of the Willamette Meteorite, perhaps the most exotic erratic of them all.

Nisbet  is the author of several books that explore the human and natural history of the Northwest, including biographies of mapmaker David Thompson and naturalist David Douglas.  

Nisbet’s most recent book, Ancient Places, is a cycle of stories about people and phenomena that helped to shape the landscape our region.  The Ice Age floods play a key role in several of these essays.

Mar
16
Thu
2017 Lower Columbia Speaker Topics – IAFI Chapter Meetings
Mar 16 @ 7:00 pm
2017 Lower Columbia Speaker Topics - IAFI Chapter Meetings @ Tualatin Heritage Center | Tualatin | Oregon | United States

Meetings of the Lower Columbia Chapter are held at 7:00 PM on the 3rd Thursday of each month at Tualatin Heritage Center, 8700 SW Sweek Drive, Tualatin, Oregon  (except September, which is held at the Tualatin Library, 18878 SW Martinazzi Avenue, Tualatin, Oregon). We share our meetings with the Tualatin Historical Society so not all are geology related.
Contact Sylvia Thompson – 503-257-0144 for more information. 

January 19, 2017
Fossils and Micro-Photography
Speaker:  Julian Gray, Executive Director of the Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks & Minerals
Mr. Gray will talk about his work using a new photography technique of taking a series of focused photo shots of small gems, minerals, bones, etc. and with a software package combining them into one photo.   He will also discuss the Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals and why it is so popular and recognized internationally. He spoke about the history of the museum and how it inspires children today to become rock hounds, collectors, geologists, and scientists through its school tours and educational programs and events.

February 16, 2017
Tom McCall and the Beach Bill (about Oregon Governor Tom McCall and the Beach Bill)
Speaker:  Tom Olsen, Jr., Tom teaches videography in local colleges and his work can be accessed at IMDB
Tom Olsen will show excerpts from the film, “The Politics of Sand,” and describe how he made the documentary which features interviews with many of the living key players as well as voices from the past.   This in-depth history of Oregon’s beaches focuses on the political ebb and flow of efforts to keep the coast accessible to the public. The fight, which began with Governor Oswald West’s 1913 landmark legislation, has thankfully been effective, though not without substantial effort

March 16, 2017
Relive the Golden Age of Radio
Speaker:  Dick Karmen
Old-time radio expert Dick Karman exhibits radios and replays examples of popular programs dating 50-70 years ago. For those over 70, re-live memories of Jack Benny and Superman in this soundtrack of your life.

April 20, 2017
Survivability of an Earthquake in Lake Missoula Flood Sediments
Speaker:  William D. Burgel, BS Engineering University of Michigan 1971, MS Geology Idaho State University 1986
Bill Burgel will discuss the geology of the Northwest and how various depositions will respond during an earthquake.  Are you in a safe place?  Come learn about the ground beneath you.  

May 18, 2017   (37th Anniversary of Eruption of Mt. St. Helens)
New Understandings of Mt. St. Helens
Speaker:  Sheila Alfsen, MAT, GIT (Oregon State Board Geologic Examiners)
Current instructor of Geology –  Chemeketa Community College, Linn Benton, Portland State University.
The 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Washington was the worst US volcanic disaster in recorded history.  Geologist Sheila Alfsen, will break down the event into its components, illustrating all volcanic hazards as geologic occurrences with examples from other volcanoes and comparing their relative sizes. Sheila will discuss the advances in volcanology made as result of the eruption, and how they are used around the world to gain prediction and offer disaster mitigation.

September 21, 2017
The Lake Missoula Floods and the Oregon Trail Connection
Speaker:  Rick Thompson, President – Lower Columbia Chapter, Ice Age Floods Institute, author of  GigaFlood – The Largest of the Lake Missoula Floods in NW Oregon and SW Washington and The Hunt for Iceberg Erratics
Location:  Tualatin Library, 18878 SW Martinazzi Avenue, Tualatin, Oregon.  
The main destination of the Oregon Trail was the Willamette Valley with its fertile soil which was brought in from eastern Washington by the Lake Missoula Floods.  Mr. Thompson will trace the path of the Floods and show where the Oregon pioneers used some of these same flood channels as their wagon trail to the Willamette Valley.  

Mar
22
Wed
AN OVERVIEW OF THE MOST RECENT ICE AGE FLOODS IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST
Mar 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

A TITANS OF THE ICE AGE:  MAMMOTHS AND MASTODONS EVENT

NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS AND CULTURE, SPOKANE, WA

You will hear Dr. Gary Ford, President of the Ice Age Floods Institute, review some of the evidence for the Ice Age Floods by following them “downstream” from western Montana to the Pacific Ocean.  Dr. Ford will also discuss some present day Pacific Northwest landscapes that are the direct result of multiple Ice Age Floods which occurred between ca.15,550 and 13,350 radiocarbon years B.P.

Dr. Ford completed BS and MS degrees in Earth Science and a Ph.D in Soil Science from Montana State University.  During college, he worked summers as a seasonal park ranger in Yellowstone National Park.  He taught Soil Science classes at Montana State University and the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point.  During his 25 years with the Forest Service, he worked as a soil scientist for the Idaho Panhandle National Forest in Coeur d’Alene, ID where he mapped more than a million acres and worked as the regional soils correlator for the Northern Region of the Forest Service.  Ford was on the Landscape Ecology Team that worked on the Ecosystem Management Project.  During the last part of his career, he was the Forest Planner on the Idaho Panhandle National Forests and co-leader of the Forest Plan Revision effort for the Idaho Panhandle and Kootenai National Forests.  He and his wife, Barbara, live in Coeur d’Alene, and are bee-keepers.

Seating Limit is 180, first-come, first-served.

The IAFI Cheney-Spokane Chapter is a sponsor for the Mammoth Exhibit.

Mar
24
Fri
Othello Sandhill Crane Festival (& FloodFest)
Mar 24 – Mar 26 all-day
Othello Sandhill Crane Festival (& FloodFest) @ Othello | Washington | United States

It’s time to begin making plans to attend the 2017 Othello Sandhill Crane Festival, you will never find so many Ice Age Floods-related lectures and tours in one place.  This year the Crane Festival will be held on March 24, 25, and 26. This festival is becoming a viable vehicle for the IAFI’s goal of having an annual Floodfest celebration.  Friday the 24th, Nick Zentner will give a talk that will summarize the general Ice Age Floods story.  Saturday the 25th will be the day most of the IAFI’s lectures will be heard.  Sunday the 26th will showcase most of our flood-related geologic tours.  We have added one additional tour this year.  Karl Lillquist will be conducting our first tour of the western Quincy Basin. The Othello Sandhill Crane Festival website will be available soon to register for these tours. 

There will be one IAFI tour on Saturday (March 25, 2017):

  • Ice Age Floods and the Channeled Scablands Tour:  Led by Brent Cunderla after his morning lecture, this trip will emphasize the geology  and catastrophic Ice Age  Flood features found near Othello and Columbia National Wildlife Refuge.  A visit to the Drumheller Channels (a National Park Service National Landmark managed by Columbia NWR), scabland topography and  ice-rafted boulders, or erratics, will be the highlights of the trip.  Brent has spent the last 25 years with the Bureau of Land Management in Wenatchee and has been actively exploring the late Pleistocene glacial geology, particularly the  Ice Age Floods features of North Central Washington.  There will be one stop for facilities and no lunch on this trip, so please plan accordingly.

There are six IAFI tours on Sunday (March 25, 2017):

  • Western Quincy Basin Tour:  Karl Lillquist will lead an all-day bus tour of the western portion of the Quincy Basin.  Ice Age Floods entered the Quincy Basin from the northeast and east.  Some of this water drained from the basin through the Drumheller Channels to the south.  The remainder flowed west exiting the basin through Frenchman Coulee, Potholes Coulee, and Crater Coulee on the western edge of the Quincy Basin.  We will examine the landform and sediment evidence for the catastrophic flood origins and evolution of each of these western flood outlets on several short (less than 1.5 mile) hikes.  You will see giant basalt columns, dry falls, potholes, plunge pools, buttes, mesas, flood bars, and more.  In addition we will explore the overall physical and human geography of the area.
  • Upper Grand Coulee Tour:  Gene Kiver will take you on an all-day bus tour that will “fight” your way upstream from Othello through the Summer Falls floodway to the Upper Grand Coulee where you will examine some of the evidence and features produced by the Missoula Floods.  Floodwaters were hundreds to almost 1,000 feet deep along the tour route and produced the spectacular Grand Coulee canyon.  Features include abandoned waterfalls, the Coulee Monocline, Steamboat Rock, and ending up at Grand Coulee Dam.  You will return to Othello through both the Upper and Lower Grand Coulee.  Time permitting; we may make additional field stops.  Bring lunch , water, and snacks.
  • Lower Grand Coulee Geology Tour:  Join John Moody, President of the Lower Grand Coulee chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute, civil and water resources engineer as you travel north and west on McManamon Road through the Columbia National Wildlife Refuge to the Drumheller Channels National Landmark overlook.  Walk out to the overlook for a presentation.  You will then travel west to view granite erratics alongside Frenchman Hills, and north to Neva Lake.  You will walk to Sundial and view Soap Lake (original plunge pool site) and the Lower Grand Coulee Monocline.  Then travel to Lake Lenore Caves and walk around and enjoy your lunch.  You will have the opportunity to view a few overlooks, Rim Rock Meadows, Sage Brush Flats Plateau and visit Monster Rock in the Ephrata Fan.  On your way back you will visit the Coulee Corridor National Scenic Byway.
  • Hanford Reach Interpretive Center and Coyote Canyon:  The Coyote Canyon Mammoth Site is an on-going paleo-ecological excavation located southwest of Kennewick.  The 17,449 year-old mammoth bones are buried in Missoula Floods sediments.  The Mid-Columbia Basin Old Natural Education Sciences (MCBONES) Research Center Foundation is a nonprofit educational organization registered with the state and federal governments and acts as an oversight and support entity for the project.  Gary Kleinknecht will take you to the dig and Dig House, a 40×40 feet pole building set up as classroom, laboratory and museum area, and the actual site.  Dress according to the weather and bring snacks and drink.  This trip will also take you to The Hanford Reach Interpretive Center (REACH) in Richland.  If you have not visited the REACH, here is your chance to see an amazing building with exhibits on the region’s natural history and Hanford.
  • Ice Age Floods Geology of the Drumheller Channels Hike:  A 5-6 mile hike, led by geologist Bruce Bjornstad, of moderate difficulty will directly explore the evidence for the Ice Age floods within the Drumheller Channels, a dramatically eroded landscape carved out by repeated Ice Age floods as recently as 13,000 years ago.  Bring sturdy footwear, camera, and lunch; bus transportation provided.
  • Palouse Falls Tour:  Lloyd Stoess and Ken Lacy will be your hosts on a tour of the Glacial Lake Missoula floodwaters that flowed through the Cheney-Palouse flood route.  The catastrophic flooding amounted to as much as nine million cubic meters of water per second, creating the landscape we see today throughout the Columbia Basin.  View some of the most spectacular examples of flood-related  geologic activity found anywhere in the world.  Highlights of the tour include Collier Coulee, Staircase Rapids spillway, Palouse-Snake River Divide, Washtucna Coulee, Mid-Canyon Bar, Devil’s Canyon, and of course, the spectacular Palouse Falls.

The motels listed below are located at the intersection of Hwy 17 and I-90 (a 22 minute drive to downtown Othello):

Holiday Inn Express & Suites, 1735 E. Kittelson Road, Moses Lake  509-766-2000Ameri – Stay Inn & Suites, 157 N. Stratford Road, Moses Lake  509-764-7500Ramada Inn, 1745 Kittleson Road, Moses Lake  509-766-1000Shilo Inn Moses Lake, 1819 E. Kittleson Road, Moses Lake  509-765-9317Inn At Moses Lake, 1741 E. Kittleson Road, Moses Lake  509-766-7000
Comfort Suites, 1700 Kittleson Road, Moses Lake  509-765-3731
Mar
25
Sat
Coyote Canyon Mammoth Site
Mar 25 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

On Saturday, March 25, MCBONES Education Director, Gary Kleinknecht, will present a talk on the Coyote Canyon Mammoth.  The talk will include a summary of mammoths, the Ice Age floods, the discovery and rediscovery of this 17,449 year old mammoth and the scientific studies that are being conducted on this site.  The talk will finish up with a discussion of sharing the mammoth with the public

Mar
27
Mon
EXPLORING WASHINGTON’S GEOLOGY
Mar 27 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

You will hear Dr. Gene Kiver’s lecture summarizing the geology of Washington State.  His presentation is based on the 2016 published book “Washington Rocks” which was designed with the non-geologist in mind.  He has selected some very interesting Washington sites of geological interest for this event.  The book is co-authored with Chad Pritchard and Rik Orndorff.  Dr. Kiver graduated from Case-Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio and later from the University of Wyoming in Laramie where he received his Doctorate in Geology.  He taught Geology for over 32 years at Eastern Washington University and conducted an active research career that emphasized landforms and surface processes.  He spends much of his time as possible following trails while photographing and exploring the geology and beauty of the natural world.  

For more information, email Melanie Bell at iaficheneyspokane@gmail.com or call 509.954.4242.  

Apr
7
Fri
Badger Mountain Geology Hike
Apr 7 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Badger Mountain Geology Hike @ Dallas Road (Skyline) Trailhead

Join geologist George Last on a 3-mile, 1/2 day hike to the top of Badger Mountain, elevation gain = 800 ft.  Learn about Lake Lewis, the Ice Age floods, the Rattlesnake – Wallula lineament, and the basalt-lava flows.  The hike stats at the Dallas Road (Skyline) Trailhead and ends at the Canyon Trailhead where a bus will take guests back to Dallas Road.  This hike is organized by the Hanford Reach Interpretive Center in partnership with the Lake Lewis Chapter of the IAFI.  Bus transportation between trailheads is included.

Apr
14
Fri
Western Scablands of the Ice Age Floods
Apr 14 all-day
Western Scablands of the Ice Age Floods @ Begins and ends at The Hanford Reach Interpretive Center | Richland | Washington | United States

Join field trip leader Gary Kleinknecht as you go “upstream” from the Tri-Cities into the Quincy Basin.  Participants will see evidence of the erosive power of the floods at the Othello and Drunheller Channels and Frenchman Coulee.  We will also get a fantastic view of the Columbia River and the giant current ripples of West Bar as well as a visit to Gingko Petrified Forest State Park.  This tour is organized by the Hanford Reach Interpretive Center in partnership with the Lake Lewis Chapter of the IAFI.  Bus, water and lunch are provided.  Duration is 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Apr
20
Thu
2017 Lower Columbia Speaker Topics – IAFI Chapter Meetings
Apr 20 @ 7:00 pm
2017 Lower Columbia Speaker Topics - IAFI Chapter Meetings @ Tualatin Heritage Center | Tualatin | Oregon | United States

Meetings of the Lower Columbia Chapter are held at 7:00 PM on the 3rd Thursday of each month at Tualatin Heritage Center, 8700 SW Sweek Drive, Tualatin, Oregon  (except September, which is held at the Tualatin Library, 18878 SW Martinazzi Avenue, Tualatin, Oregon). We share our meetings with the Tualatin Historical Society so not all are geology related.
Contact Sylvia Thompson – 503-257-0144 for more information. 

January 19, 2017
Fossils and Micro-Photography
Speaker:  Julian Gray, Executive Director of the Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks & Minerals
Mr. Gray will talk about his work using a new photography technique of taking a series of focused photo shots of small gems, minerals, bones, etc. and with a software package combining them into one photo.   He will also discuss the Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals and why it is so popular and recognized internationally. He spoke about the history of the museum and how it inspires children today to become rock hounds, collectors, geologists, and scientists through its school tours and educational programs and events.

February 16, 2017
Tom McCall and the Beach Bill (about Oregon Governor Tom McCall and the Beach Bill)
Speaker:  Tom Olsen, Jr., Tom teaches videography in local colleges and his work can be accessed at IMDB
Tom Olsen will show excerpts from the film, “The Politics of Sand,” and describe how he made the documentary which features interviews with many of the living key players as well as voices from the past.   This in-depth history of Oregon’s beaches focuses on the political ebb and flow of efforts to keep the coast accessible to the public. The fight, which began with Governor Oswald West’s 1913 landmark legislation, has thankfully been effective, though not without substantial effort

March 16, 2017
Relive the Golden Age of Radio
Speaker:  Dick Karmen
Old-time radio expert Dick Karman exhibits radios and replays examples of popular programs dating 50-70 years ago. For those over 70, re-live memories of Jack Benny and Superman in this soundtrack of your life.

April 20, 2017
Survivability of an Earthquake in Lake Missoula Flood Sediments
Speaker:  William D. Burgel, BS Engineering University of Michigan 1971, MS Geology Idaho State University 1986
Bill Burgel will discuss the geology of the Northwest and how various depositions will respond during an earthquake.  Are you in a safe place?  Come learn about the ground beneath you.  

May 18, 2017   (37th Anniversary of Eruption of Mt. St. Helens)
New Understandings of Mt. St. Helens
Speaker:  Sheila Alfsen, MAT, GIT (Oregon State Board Geologic Examiners)
Current instructor of Geology –  Chemeketa Community College, Linn Benton, Portland State University.
The 1980 eruption of Mt. St. Helens in Washington was the worst US volcanic disaster in recorded history.  Geologist Sheila Alfsen, will break down the event into its components, illustrating all volcanic hazards as geologic occurrences with examples from other volcanoes and comparing their relative sizes. Sheila will discuss the advances in volcanology made as result of the eruption, and how they are used around the world to gain prediction and offer disaster mitigation.

September 21, 2017
The Lake Missoula Floods and the Oregon Trail Connection
Speaker:  Rick Thompson, President – Lower Columbia Chapter, Ice Age Floods Institute, author of  GigaFlood – The Largest of the Lake Missoula Floods in NW Oregon and SW Washington and The Hunt for Iceberg Erratics
Location:  Tualatin Library, 18878 SW Martinazzi Avenue, Tualatin, Oregon.  
The main destination of the Oregon Trail was the Willamette Valley with its fertile soil which was brought in from eastern Washington by the Lake Missoula Floods.  Mr. Thompson will trace the path of the Floods and show where the Oregon pioneers used some of these same flood channels as their wagon trail to the Willamette Valley.  

Apr
22
Sat
Rattlesnake Mountain Erratics and Wildflower Hike
Apr 22 @ 9:00 am – 2:00 pm
Rattlesnake Mountain Erratics and Wildflower Hike @ Begins and ends at The Hanford Reach Interpretive Center | Richland | Washington | United States

Join geologist-author Bruce Bjornstad on a 4-5 mile hike across the publicly accessible Rattlesnake Slope Wildlife Area.  Elevation gain is 300 feet.  The hike will focus on many of the thousands of ice-rafted erratics and bergmounds on Rattlesnake Mountain.  This hike is organized by The Reach in partnership with the Lake Lewis Chapter of the IAFI.  Bus, water and lunch are included.

2017 Spring IAFI Board Meeting
Apr 22 @ 12:00 pm – Apr 23 @ 12:15 pm

The Spring Board of Directors meeting of the Ice Age Floods Institute will be held April 22-23 at the Best Western Plus in Pasco, WA. 

More information to follow

Apr
28
Fri
LECTURE: MEGAFLOOD PATHWAY GLACIAL LAKE COLUMBIA FROM CHENEY TO FORT SPOKANE
Apr 28 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Location of this event will be recorded here as soon as the details are finalized.

FREE LECTURE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Come and hear Dr. Linda McCollum discuss important features along the great glacial Lake Missoula outburst megaflood  pathway traversing diverse landforms beginning with the headwaters to the periglacial scabland terrane through remnants of the megaflood fill at the bottom of glacial Lake Columbia and northward to the southern extent of the Cordilleran ice sheet.

Dr. Linda McCollum has been a Professor of Geology at Eastern Washington University since 1983 and volunteers on the Board of Directors for the Cheney-Spokane Chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute.  

 

This event is co-sponsored with the EWU Department of Geology.

Apr
29
Sat
Frenchman Springs Hike and Field Trip
Apr 29 all-day

The Puget Lobe Chapter is offering a one day field trip to explore Frenchman Springs and Potholes Coulees.  Bus transportation, lunch, and a barbecue dinner overlooking the West Bar Giant ripples is included.  Registration forms will be posted soon.

 

 

Hydrologeology of Beer and Wine
Apr 29 all-day
Hydrologeology of Beer and Wine @ Field Trip begins and ends at The Reach | Richland | Washington | United States

Field trip leader and local geologist George Last will explore the many aspects of the geology and hydrogeology in the lower Yakima River Basin, as they relate to water resources which support local beer and wine industries.  The tour will include the Red Mountain American Viticulture Area, Snipes Mountain Conglomerate, Zillah Rhythmites, Rosa Diversion Dam and the Prosser Irrigated agriculture Research Center. This tour is organized by the Reach in partnership with the Lake Lewis Chapter of the IAFI.  Bus, water and lunch are included.  Duration is 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Columbia Gorge Geology Field Trip
Apr 29 @ 7:30 am – 5:30 pm

Logo IAFI-CGC HighResJoin the Gorge Chapter of Ice Age Floods Institute for a Geology of the Columbia Gorge field trip covering the central portion of the Columbia Gorge, exploring many interesting geologic features of the Gorge with emphasis on the impact of the Ice Age Floods through this area.

We will meet-up to board the bus at the Cascade Locks Marine Park parking lot and make a circuit covering both the Oregon and Washington sides of the Gorge with stops all the way east past The Dalles. There will be a number of drive-by and off-and-back-on the bus stops, as well as some stops with relatively short walks on good trails.

If you’re interested in participating in one of our field trips please Register Online or download and complete the IAFI-CGC Field Trip Registration Form. For more information contact field trip leader, Lloyd DeKay at IAFI.CGC@gmail.com

FIELD TRIP: MEGAFLOOD PATHWAY FROM CHENEY TO FORT SPOKANE
Apr 29 @ 7:30 pm – 6:00 pm

FINAL DETAILS WILL BE UPDATED AND REGISTRATION FORM MADE AVAILABLE AS SOON AS LOGISTICS ARE FINALIZED.

You will have Dr. Linda McCollum and Michael McCollum leading this field trip down glacial Lake Columbia from Cheney to Fort Spokane. From Cheney, participants will travel west in a deluxe bus to Fort Spokane, then northeast through the Spokane Indian Reservation to Wellpinit.  Stops will provide you with important features along the great glacial Lake Missoula outburst megaflood pathway.  This field trip traverses diverse landforms, beginning with the headwaters to the periglacial scabland terrane through remnants of the megaflood fill at the bottom of glacial Lake Columbia and northward to the southern extent of the Cordilleran ice sheet.  

Dr. Linda McCollum has been a Professor of Geology at Eastern Washington University since 1983. She volunteers on the Board of Directors of the Cheney-Spokane Chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute.

Michael McCollum is an earth scientist and also volunteers on the Board of Directors of the Cheney-Spokane Chapter of the Ice Age Floods Institute.

This field trip is co-sponsored with the EWU Department of Geology.

May
6
Sat
Dry Falls and the Lower Grand Coulee
May 6 all-day
Dry Falls and the Lower Grand Coulee @ Tour begins and ends at The Reach | Richland | Washington | United States

IAFI vice president Gary Kleinknecht leads this field trip “upstream” into the Lower Grand Coulee.  Participants will visit the Othello and Drumheller Channels in addition to Dry Falls, Soap Lake, Pinto Ridge, the Grand Coulee Monocline and more.  This tour is organized by the Reach in partnership with the Lake Lewis Chapter of the IAFI.  Bus, water and lunch are provided.  Duration is 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.